TRAVEL NEWS

13 Thing We CANNOT Forget on Our First Post-COVID Trip

When we head back out into the world, we’ll carry what we learned during the pandemic with us.

It can feel crass to search for silver linings during a tragedy. There are, however, lessons to be learned in how the pandemic changed the world and us. As we think about “the new normal” and scope out future travel plans, let’s take a look at 13 travel lessons from COVID.

You Might Just Bump Into Joe Biden at These 11 Spots in Delaware

Discover the 46th President’s favorite home state places.

In the small state of Delaware, population 975,000, the saying goes that “everyone knows Joe.” And part of the reason, locals have shared, is because he takes the time to get to know you. He loves being out in the neighborhoods, chomping on a burger at a local BBQ joint, or cooling off with ice cream at the beach, and he is always mingling, asking questions, and listening to stories. His visits will become a little more complex, of course, when he takes on the presidential mantle, but one thing is sure—when he’s back in town, he’ll figure out a way to stop by his favorite places and greet his fellow Delawareans. Here’s where you might run into him.

Do You Really Need Rental Car Insurance? Or Is It a Huge Waste of Money?

Rental car insurance doesn’t have to be the mysterious threat we make it out to be.

If you’ve ever rented a car, you know that inevitable moment when the rental car associate begins to pressure you to sign up for all the different kinds of insurance. Should you sign it? Rental car insurance used to feel like a lose-lose situation. It was that expensive add-on that made me feel duped when I signed up for it and anxious when I didn’t. Having had my fair share of disastrous rental car experiences, I am now one of those people who reads all the terms and conditions before signing waivers. If you’re wondering whether or not you should buy the car insurance from the rental car company, let these 10 points be your guide (but not your legal advice).

Where Can You Travel? What’s Open? What’s Closed? Here’s the Current Status for All 50 States

The states are starting to reopen. But is it wise to venture out?

[Editor’s note: This is an updated version of an article that originally ran on May 19.] Disclaimer: This is meant to be a general overview of how each state is reopening. It is not intended to provide every last detail regarding guidelines and restrictions; please refer to the government website of each state for specifics. In addition, please remember that even if a state has been given the green light for a category of businesses to reopen, individual businesses may choose to remain closed. As such, please be sure to contact each business or site before visiting to ensure that it is open. As the United States begins to relax its shelter-in-place orders and some emerge from their homes, many are counting the days when we can get back out there and travel, even if it’s by car to a neighboring community or state. But as we know, a very different landscape awaits out there than the one we left earlier this winter at the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. There are things travelers must consider that we never did before, including social distancing and personal sanitization. The big question is: Is it safe to travel in the United States? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is pretty clear in its stance. It’s recommended that you stay home as much as possible, especially if your trip is not essential. Social distancing still needs to be practiced, especially if you are in a higher risk category or an older adult. You shouldn’t travel if you feel sick, or travel with someone who is sick. And you need to protect yourself and others by knowing how to prevent the virus from spreading.  Perhaps the most hopeful advice comes from Dr. Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. According to him, summer travel “can be in the cards.” He urges caution, since we risk COVID-19 spreading rapidly if proper precautions are not taken. “When infections start to rear their heads again,” he says, “we have to put in place a very aggressive and effective way to identify, isolate, contact trace, and make sure we don’t have those spikes we have now.” As long as we’re aware that “getting back to normal is not like a light switch that you turn on and off,” he says, we should be able to get back to some sort of normalcy. So the answer is: We’re not quite there yet. The best thing to do is pay attention to the several-phase reopening plans that each state has developed, outlining when hotels, restaurants, retail businesses, outdoor areas, etc., should be open for business and what precautions they must take. Some states are freer than others—and that’s something to consider. Do you really want to be on a beach where social distancing guidelines aren’t being maintained? It’s a whole new world that we’ll be navigating, literally. The guidelines are fast-changing and it’s hard to keep up, but here’s where they stand today, state by state.